debian squeeze/wheezy to backports kernel

Step 1:

Open up a root terminal.
Edit /etc/apt/sources.list
Append the Squeeze Backports
deb http://backports.debian.org/debian-backports squeeze-backports main contrib non-free

deb-src http://backports.debian.org/debian-backports squeeze-backports main contrib non-free

Update aptitude
aptitude update
Step 2:

There are quite a few different kernels available between the standard respositories and the backports repository. What you will need to do next is assure you are installing the correct kernel by searching with aptitude for the correct name of the linux-image package. After that you will want to also find the correct name for the linux-headers package so you can compile any kernel modules needed with the new kernel. Once you have found the package names install them from backports.

Open a root terminal
Type: aptitude search linux-image-
Copy the name of the kernel you wish to install
Type: aptitude search linux-headers-
Copy the linux-header name that matches your kernel version
Next install the packages In my case I chose linux-image 3.2 amd64. So I would type and run the following in a root terminal:

apt-get install -t squeeze-backports linux-image-2.6.39-bpo.2-amd64linux-headers-3.2.0-0.bpo.1-amd64Step 1:

Open up a root terminal.
Edit /etc/apt/sources.list
Append the Squeeze Backports
deb http://backports.debian.org/debian-backports squeeze-backports main contrib non-free

deb-src http://backports.debian.org/debian-backports squeeze-backports main contrib non-free

Update aptitude
aptitude update
Step 2:

There are quite a few different kernels available between the standard respositories and the backports repository. What you will need to do next is assure you are installing the correct kernel by searching with aptitude for the correct name of the linux-image package. After that you will want to also find the correct name for the linux-headers package so you can compile any kernel modules needed with the new kernel. Once you have found the package names install them from backports.

Open a root terminal
Type: aptitude search linux-image-
Copy the name of the kernel you wish to install
Type: aptitude search linux-headers-
Copy the linux-header name that matches your kernel version
Next install the packages In my case I chose linux-image 3.2 amd64. So I would type and run the following in a root terminal:

apt-get install -t squeeze-backports linux-image-2.6.39-bpo.2-amd64linux-headers-3.2.0-0.bpo.1-amd64

Step 3:

Now you are ready to reboot your system into the new kernel. Upon reboot you will see a new entry in the Grub bootloader with your old kernel and your new kernel. You should wait to remove the old kernel from your system. After you are sure that everything works in your new kernel you can remove the old one. I have taken the approach of simply removing the old kernel entry from my grub menu, and leaving the old linux-image package installed on my system.

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